So, What are elk doing around Jackson, WY right now?

Elk are now in the midst of their mating season. Bulls have established their “harems” of cows and will mate as soon as the females are receptive.

Soon elk will begin their annual migration from areas north of Jackson, WY towards the National Elk Refuge which abuts the town of Jackson.

Some elk will travel 40-50 miles to reach the Refuge. Most will not travel that far.

Once the elk arrive at the Refuge, their numbers can reach as many as 10,000 and can be easily seen on a daily basis. They generally arrive on the Refuge in December and return to their summer range (north) in April.

What are Bighorn Sheep doing in Jackson, WY now?

What are Bighorn Sheep doing aroundJackson, WY right now?

Specifically, they will soon migrate within Grand Teton National Park. Their migration from the Jackson Hole Valley should begin in only a few weeks. The ones right around Jackson will move only a few miles north (15-20 miles) in late April and then return late next fall for the winter,

Bighorn sheep have horns as opposed to antlers. Horns remain on an animal’s body for life (bison, pronghorn and sheep). In contrast, antlers are grown and shed each year (moose, elk, whitetail and mule deer).

Interestingly, both species have a penchant for salt. Although salt is not used for road maintenance here, these animals are sometimes seen in the middle of a road pawing at the ice/snow to release these tasty salt fragments from a road surface. In fact, I’ve seen mobile signs directing the public not to let these animals lick a vehicle…for safety and/or fear of disease transmission..

Moreover, here in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, these animals are an integral part of the overall ecosystem and deserve special consideration and respect when seen in close proximity.

Come see these and other magnificent animals on a private tour
with Teton Wild.
Mark Bolen
Owner-Teton Wild
www.tetonwild.com

#Teton Wild Custom Wildlife Tours #Grand Teton National Park #Photography Tours Grand Teton National Park #Eco Tours Grand Teton National Park

Where can I see wild Bison?

What animal most frequently comes to mind to people when they think of “WILD”?

Bison are one of the most recognizable, iconic figures of the American West.

During the late 1800’s, they numbered in the millions.  Now, around Jackson, WY there are about 500.  In Yellowstone National Park, there are about 5,000 animals.  Both groups can be seen fairly easily.  Elsewhere in western North America and Canada, there are some “wild” populations, but few that are truly wild (unfenced) like those in Jackson and Yellowstone.  The Yellowstone herd is genetically pure.  The Jackson herd is not and are descendants of about a dozen bison which escaped from a ranch  near Moran, WY back in the 1960’s.

Bison are herd animals and therefore travel in groups. They are grazers and feed on native grasses. An adult bull can weigh 2,200 lbs and run 35 miles an  hour.  Their body structure makes things more easy than for other animals when trying to find grasses buried under feet of snow.  Specificly, their neck and shoulders are massive, allowing them to remove snow with their heads from the grasses they seek below. Bison normally have 1 calf in spring, which can weigh 40 lbs at birth. It is said and written that a Bison can jump a 6 ft fence.  I’ve only seen them jump a 4 ft fence. Regardless, they are large animals that can be very athletic.

Here around Jackson, the local herd does not “migrate”, but they do move around.  Primarily, from the area right around town to an area about 30 miles north (within Grand Teton National Park).  In contrast, a portion of the bison in Yellowstone herd does “migrate” north onto private ranch lands in late winter.
There, the concern amongst ranchers is that Bison may transmit Brucellosis to the cattle/sheep. Special winter hunting seasons have been allowed to Native American Groups as well as ranchers.

Though slow and unintelligent looking, Bison are an iconic and beautiful wild animal to see up close.

Let Teton Wild Custom Wildlife Tours give your group an up close view and information about these and other animals in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
#Teton Wild #Grand Teton National Park #Yellowstone National Park #Jackson Hole Wildlife Tours #Private Wildlife Tours Jackson, WY

Viewing Bears near Jackson, Wyoming

Bears are going through a major change right now in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
Specifically, they are emerging from their winter dens.

The 1st to emerge (happening right now) will be adult males, then mothers with last year’s cubs, then mothers with newborns. All will come out of the den ravenous and will be constantly looking for food.

For a few months, they will focus on winter kills (elk, moose, bison) and then roots, flowers and grasses. Later in summer they turn to white bark pine seeds and ripe berries and even army cutworm moths..

Once back in the den for hibernation in December, bears will not eat, urinate or defecate until the following spring.

#Ecotours Grand Teton National Park, #Photography Tours Grand Teton National Park, #Wildlife Tours Grand Teton National Park

Visiting Snake River Overlook in Grand Teton National Park

Snake River Overlook is one of the most frequently requested stops on our tours. It’s one of the most scenic views in Grand Teton National Park and its popularity amongst visitors has been boosted by photographs by the renowned photographer Ansel Adams. From this vantage point, one can see both the Snake River Valley and Grand Teton Range.

Weather permitting, Teton Wild, LLC makes it a point to stop at this spectacular view.
There, we discuss with patrons the magnificent scenery, geology and abundant wildlife that call this region home.

www.tetonwild.com
#Grand Teton National Park #Jackson Hole Wildlife Tours #Snake River Overlook #Scenic and Wildlife Tours #Ecotours #Teton Wild